Table of Contents  
LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 331

Reply-letter to editor: From compression to injections: prostaglandins paving a new direction for venous leg ulcer treatment


Departments of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Ramaiah Medical College, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India

Date of Submission29-Nov-2019
Date of Decision29-Nov-2019
Date of Acceptance29-Nov-2019
Date of Web Publication20-Dec-2019

Correspondence Address:
Rajendra Prasad Basavanthappa
Departments of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Ramaiah Medical College, Bengaluru, Karnataka
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijves.ijves_101_19

Rights and Permissions

How to cite this article:
Basavanthappa RP, Gangadharan AN, Desai SC, Chandrashekar A R. Reply-letter to editor: From compression to injections: prostaglandins paving a new direction for venous leg ulcer treatment. Indian J Vasc Endovasc Surg 2019;6:331

How to cite this URL:
Basavanthappa RP, Gangadharan AN, Desai SC, Chandrashekar A R. Reply-letter to editor: From compression to injections: prostaglandins paving a new direction for venous leg ulcer treatment. Indian J Vasc Endovasc Surg [serial online] 2019 [cited 2020 Jan 22];6:331. Available from: http://www.indjvascsurg.org/text.asp?2019/6/4/331/273585



Sir,

Thank you for the wonderful feedback and pointing out the issues.

First with regard to the cost of prostaglandin. At our center, prostaglandin costs around Rs. 4800–5200. Considering the early healing of the ulcer resulting in decreased hospital trips and the number of dressings, the overall cost may even out. But for confirmation, we have to analyze the same which was not done in our study as it was a pilot study. We shall try to include the same in the future.

Second, regarding the potential for major side effects of prostaglandins. All the patients in the study were thoroughly counseled and the high risks were explained. During the prostaglandin infusion, vitals were monitored hourly and any side effects were identified and corrected immediately. As we were not comfortable performing a retrograde venous perfusion, the same was not attempted.

Finally, with regard to the Split thickness skin grafts (SSG). We have a considerable load of venous ulcer patients in our center and the vascular surgery team and plastic surgery team have not noted good results with SSG in these patients. The factors, which we noted, were usually due to cost and compliance. Hence, these days we do not prefer SSGs in venous ulcers.

Best Regards.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.






 

Top
 
 
  Search
 
Similar in PUBMED
Access Statistics
Email Alert *
Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)

 
  In this article

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed52    
    Printed0    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded6    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal


[TAG2]
[TAG3]
[TAG4]